Hollaa!

What a month it’s been, filled with a lot of exciting things for me this August–not including the sleepless nights– in the energy and sustainability space!

First up, I joined the SustyVibes community officially in May and went with the Abuja team to support the Stop Don’t Drop initiative at it’s beautification project at the LEA Primary School in Gwarimpa, Abuja this month.

Our team’s work for the project was to up-cycle used tires and rim covers into an animated turtle and bed of flowers. Fun stuff!

After a lot of blood, sweat and tears, we achieved our goal as pictured above and I must say it was rewarding. Other interesting thing I got to see there was the solar power system used to provide electricity to the school. It’s great seeing that a lot of work is going on and more can be done especially with landscaping within the school and hopefully the students will benefit a great deal from such projects!

Earlier that week, I had worked with the amazing team at the organization I work for, Clean Tech Hub, to engage young women in Abuja and enlighten them about the benefits of utilizing clean and more efficient energy sources in the urban and rural communities. The program also touched on the various ways women can get more involved the off-grid renewable energy space and countered any cultural notions towards the involvement of women in renewable energy professions. The program, that saw a turnout of close to 100 people, was vital to the promotion of the need for women’s participation in increasing energy access. Living in a bubble like Abuja’s or outside Nigeria, it’s easy to over look the needs or condemn the government for the work it does not execute but at the end of the day, progress is in our hands as individuals who choose to collaborate too. The interactive sessions brought about partnerships between the attendees, solutions to problems affecting the attendees in their communities and pledges on next steps.

To cap it off, I spent most of the last few days of the month (and my time off) enjoying nature and learning from our foremost agriculturist (Alhaji Amodu) about farming practices–animal husbandry, aquaculture and horticulture. It was great listening to him talk about what he’s passionate about and also reap fruits of his labour 😀 in the pictures below. The “excursion” left me thinking about how I can start growing my coffee beans at home and also encourage urban farming!! Exciting stuff!

That’s enough about my month, how has yours been?

What are your thoughts about energy access, up-cycling and urban farming? Sound off in the comments section.

Ceeday